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Amethyst

from

South Korea and Japan

 

A selection of old Korean amethysts, and specimens from a new Japanese find


 

HN01 Amethyst

Namarisawa, Ashio-machi, Nikko City, Tochigi Prefecture, Kanto Region, Honshu Island, Japan
5.3x 4.4x 3.6 cm

 

 

A cluster of amethyst crystals from a recent Japanese find.  One dealer had a small lot of these crystals available, I purchased all but one.

Japanese minerals are seldom seen for sale, and this is particularly true of those that are moderately aesthetic.  The last major new find from the country was of henmilite, over 8 years ago.  This find is obviously not of the same magnitude or importance, though it is still an interesting example of new Japanese material.

All of the Japanese amethysts on this page have some damage or missing crystals, but then again, this is not the sort of material that is often seen on the Western market, in any condition.

A few people remarked that they are similar in appearance to amethysts from Guerrerro, only with lighter color.

 

IMG_8152.JPG (61656 bytes)
IMG_8153.JPG (61729 bytes) IMG_8151.JPG (61160 bytes)

 

HN02 Amethyst 

Namarisawa, Ashio-machi, Nikko City, Tochigi Prefecture, Kanto Region, Honshu Island, Japan
6.4x 3.3x 2.2 cm

 

A cluster of amethyst crystals from a recent Japanese find.  One dealer had a small lot of these crystals available, I purchased all but one.

Japanese minerals are seldom seen for sale, and this is particularly true of those that are moderately aesthetic.  The last major new find from the country was of henmilite, over 8 years ago.  This find is obviously not of the same magnitude or importance, though it is still an interesting example of new Japanese material.

All of the Japanese amethysts on this page have some damage or missing crystals, but then again, this is not the sort of material that is often seen on the Western market, in any condition.

A few people remarked that they are similar in appearance to amethysts from Guerrerro, only with lighter color.

 

IMG_8159.JPG (64790 bytes)
IMG_8156.JPG (45150 bytes) IMG_8157.JPG (45038 bytes)

 

HN03 Amethyst 

Namarisawa, Ashio-machi, Nikko City, Tochigi Prefecture, Kanto Region, Honshu Island, Japan
5.3x 4.4x 3.3 cm

 

 

A cluster of amethyst crystals from a recent Japanese find.  One dealer had a small lot of these crystals available, I purchased all but one.

Japanese minerals are seldom seen for sale, and this is particularly true of those that are moderately aesthetic.  The last major new find from the country was of henmilite, over 8 years ago.  This find is obviously not of the same magnitude or importance, though it is still an interesting example of new Japanese material.

All of the Japanese amethysts on this page have some damage or missing crystals, but then again, this is not the sort of material that is often seen on the Western market, in any condition.

A few people remarked that they are similar in appearance to amethysts from Guerrerro, only with lighter color.

 

IMG_8143.JPG (50058 bytes)
IMG_8144.JPG (53871 bytes) IMG_8141.JPG (55000 bytes)

 

HN04 Amethyst 

Namarisawa, Ashio-machi, Nikko City, Tochigi Prefecture, Kanto Region, Honshu Island, Japan
6.8x 3.5x 3.3 cm

 

 

A cluster of amethyst crystals from a recent Japanese find.  One dealer had a small lot of these crystals available, I purchased all but one.

Japanese minerals are seldom seen for sale, and this is particularly true of those that are moderately aesthetic.  The last major new find from the country was of henmilite, over 8 years ago.  This find is obviously not of the same magnitude or importance, though it is still an interesting example of new Japanese material.

All of the Japanese amethysts on this page have some damage or missing crystals, but then again, this is not the sort of material that is often seen on the Western market, in any condition.  The matrix consists mostly of sheared crystals.

A few people remarked that they are similar in appearance to amethysts from Guerrerro, only with lighter color.

 

IMG_8146.JPG (52969 bytes)
IMG_8145.JPG (47992 bytes) IMG_8147.JPG (41781 bytes)

 

HN05 Amethyst 

Namarisawa, Ashio-machi, Nikko City, Tochigi Prefecture, Kanto Region, Honshu Island, Japan
6.4x 4.9x 2.1 cm

$330

 

A cluster of amethyst crystals from a recent Japanese find.  One dealer had a small lot of these crystals available, I purchased all but one.

Japanese minerals are seldom seen for sale, and this is particularly true of those that are moderately aesthetic.  The last major new find from the country was of henmilite, over 8 years ago.  This find is obviously not of the same magnitude or importance, though it is still an interesting example of new Japanese material.

All of the Japanese amethysts on this page have some damage or missing crystals, but then again, this is not the sort of material that is often seen on the Western market, in any condition.

A few people remarked that they are similar in appearance to amethysts from Guerrerro, only with lighter color.

 

IMG_8150.JPG (57706 bytes)
IMG_8148.JPG (55732 bytes) IMG_8149.JPG (54929 bytes)

 

HN06 Amethyst 

Namarisawa, Ashio-machi, Nikko City, Tochigi Prefecture, Kanto Region, Honshu Island, Japan
3.6x 4.2x 1.8 cm

$195

 

A cluster of amethyst crystals from a recent Japanese find.  One dealer had a small lot of these crystals available, I purchased all but one.

Japanese minerals are seldom seen for sale, and this is particularly true of those that are moderately aesthetic.  The last major new find from the country was of henmilite, over 8 years ago.  This find is obviously not of the same magnitude or importance, though it is still an interesting example of new Japanese material.

All of the Japanese amethysts on this page have some damage or missing crystals, but then again, this is not the sort of material that is often seen on the Western market, in any condition.

A few people remarked that they are similar in appearance to amethysts from Guerrerro, only with lighter color.

 

IMG_8160.JPG (44922 bytes)
IMG_8161.JPG (48487 bytes) IMG_8162.JPG (47510 bytes)

IMG_8163.JPG (44073 bytes)


 

HN07 Amethyst 

Eonyang, Kyeongsangnam-do, South Korea
10.4x 11.4x 8.3 cm

$2000

 

A large and very rare sceptered amethyst from Korea, with a custom wooden base.

Amethyst mining in this area goes back over a thousand years to (at least) the Silla period, and has continued intermittently since, with work being carried out by locals, by the Japanese during the occupation, and most recently by a Korean mining company in the 1980's.  Today, the excavated caves are home to a sort of amusement park.  These specimens are undoubtedly old, and represent particularly fine examples of this rare material.

More recently, sceptered amethysts have been found in Namibia and Madagascar. Prior to those African finds, Korean amethysts scepters were among the most sought after.  These days, given the rarity of Korean pieces, and the abundance of pieces from Africa, these remain largely forgotten.

This is the largest single crystal I purchased, it displays well from the front or slightly angled, though as shown in the bottom left photograph, it is not complete all around.  Regardless, this is a huge amethyst point, and exceptionally large for a scepter from any locality

IMG_8302.JPG (64122 bytes)

IMG_8305.JPG (65381 bytes)

IMG_8129.JPG (59373 bytes) IMG_8130.JPG (58879 bytes)
IMG_8131.JPG (65581 bytes) IMG_8132.JPG (73825 bytes)

 

HN08 Amethyst 

Eonyang, Kyeongsangnam-do, South Korea
8.1x 6.7x 5.0 cm

 

 

A large and very rare cluster of sceptered amethysts from Korea, with a custom wooden base.

Amethyst mining in this area goes back over a thousand years to (at least) the Silla period, and has continued intermittently since, with work being carried out by locals, by the Japanese during the occupation, and most recently by a Korean mining company in the 1980's.  Today, the excavated caves are home to a sort of amusement park.  These specimens are undoubtedly old, and represent particularly fine examples of this rare material.

This is my favorite of the Korean amethysts I purchased, it looks almost like a cluster of purple mushrooms.  The largest crystal has a substantial chip on the termination, but it appears as shown in the pictures.

More recently, sceptered amethysts have been found in Namibia and Madagascar. Prior to those African finds, Korean amethysts scepters were among the most sought after.  These days, given the rarity of Korean pieces, and the abundance of pieces from Africa, these remain largely forgotten.

If it doesn't sell, this one will probably end up in my collection.

 

 

IMG_8116.JPG (76443 bytes)
IMG_8117.JPG (74887 bytes) IMG_8118.JPG (80875 bytes)

IMG_8119.JPG (79669 bytes)


 

HN09 Amethyst 

Eonyang, Kyeongsangnam-do, South Korea
11.6x 10.4x 4.8 cm

 

 

A large and very rare cluster of sceptered amethysts from Korea, with a custom wooden base.

Amethyst mining in this area goes back over a thousand years to (at least) the Silla period, and has continued intermittently since, with work being carried out by locals, by the Japanese during the occupation, and most recently by a Korean mining company in the 1980's.  Today, the excavated caves are home to a sort of amusement park.  These specimens are undoubtedly old, and represent particularly fine examples of this rare material.

This is a large and particularly complex cluster of crystals, and the terminations have excellent color.  Along with the preceding specimen, this is one of my two favorites from the group.

More recently, sceptered amethysts have been found in Namibia and Madagascar. Prior to those African finds, Korean amethysts scepters were among the most sought after.  These days, given the rarity of Korean pieces, and the abundance of pieces from Africa, these remain largely forgotten.

If it doesn't sell, this one will probably also end up in my collection.

 

 

IMG_8121.JPG (151881 bytes)
IMG_8122.JPG (85816 bytes) IMG_8123.JPG (85184 bytes)

IMG_8124.JPG (98063 bytes)


 

HN10 Amethyst 

Eonyang, Kyeongsangnam-do, South Korea
10.4x 3.9x 3.4 cm

$650

 

A dumbbell-like, double terminated (and double sceptered) amethyst from South Korea.

Amethyst mining in this area goes back over a thousand years to (at least) the Silla period, and has continued intermittently since, with work being carried out by locals, by the Japanese during the occupation, and most recently by a Korean mining company in the 1980's.  Today, the excavated caves are home to a sort of amusement park.  These specimens are undoubtedly old, and represent particularly fine examples of this rare material.

More recently, sceptered amethysts have been found in Namibia and Madagascar. Prior to those African finds, Korean amethysts scepters were among the most sought after.  These days, given the rarity of Korean pieces, and the abundance of pieces from Africa, these remain largely forgotten.

This is the only double terminated/ double sceptered specimen I have seen from the site-- though it's not like  I have seen all that many crystals from here to begin with.

 

IMG_8137.JPG (66447 bytes)
IMG_8138.JPG (62484 bytes) IMG_8139.JPG (65933 bytes)

 

HN11 Amethyst 

Eonyang, Kyeongsangnam-do, South Korea
8.0x 7.7x 5.0 cm

$670

 

A large and very rare cluster of sceptered amethysts from Korea, with a custom wooden base.  There is some contacting on the reverse.

Amethyst mining in this area goes back over a thousand years to (at least) the Silla period, and has continued intermittently since, with work being carried out by locals, by the Japanese during the occupation, and most recently by a Korean mining company in the 1980's.  Today, the excavated caves are home to a sort of amusement park.  These specimens are undoubtedly old, and represent particularly fine examples of this rare material.

More recently, sceptered amethysts have been found in Namibia and Madagascar. Prior to those African finds, Korean amethysts scepters were among the most sought after.  These days, given the rarity of Korean pieces, and the abundance of pieces from Africa, these remain largely forgotten.

 

 

IMG_8125.JPG (72645 bytes)
IMG_8126.JPG (55698 bytes) IMG_8127.JPG (73537 bytes)

 

HN12 Amethyst 

Eonyang, Kyeongsangnam-do, South Korea
8.8x 6.0x 4.4 cm

$490

 

A large and very rare sceptered amethyst from Korea, with a custom wooden base.

Amethyst mining in this area goes back over a thousand years to (at least) the Silla period, and has continued intermittently since, with work being carried out by locals, by the Japanese during the occupation, and most recently by a Korean mining company in the 1980's.  Today, the excavated caves are home to a sort of amusement park.  These specimens are undoubtedly old, and represent particularly fine examples of this rare material.

More recently, sceptered amethysts have been found in Namibia and Madagascar. Prior to those African finds, Korean amethysts scepters were among the most sought after.  These days, given the rarity of Korean pieces, and the abundance of pieces from Africa, these remain largely forgotten.

The color on this one is a bit lighter, and there is some contacting on the reverse.  The price takes this into account.

 

 

IMG_8133.JPG (64490 bytes)
IMG_8134.JPG (61838 bytes) IMG_8135.JPG (56617 bytes)

 

HN13 Amethyst 

Eonyang, Kyeongsangnam-do, South Korea
8.2x 5.1x 3.8 cm

$195

 

A cluster of amethyst crystals from South Korea.  There is damage scattered around the piece, but it is pretty much as shown in the pictures, and the price takes this into account.  In any case, when was the last time you saw a Korean amethyst for under $200?  

Amethyst mining in this area goes back over a thousand years to (at least) the Silla period, and has continued intermittently since, with work being carried out by locals, by the Japanese during the occupation, and most recently by a Korean mining company in the 1980's.  Today, the excavated caves are home to a sort of amusement park.  

 

IMG_8299.JPG (55003 bytes)
IMG_8300.JPG (54722 bytes) IMG_8301.JPG (54857 bytes)

 

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Inner Mongolia III    (new 2/15/2012)


 
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