NAMIBIA!


After staying in-country since the start of the pandemic, I spent most of January in Namibia, focusing on Erongo.  I don't usually post trip pictures, but I would like to share a few images and thoughts.   

While my experiences pale in comparison to some of you exploration geologists, I consider myself a fairly seasoned mineral traveler, having taken solo buying trips to a number of countries since I was 19. With that said, the level of difficulty I observed on Erongo was unlike anything I've yet seen in other countries.  Reaching Erongo (see below) is difficult enough, then it requires hikes that maintain a 40+ degree incline, sometimes obstructed by boulders and (once past the talus near the base) over sheer granite faces. Upon reaching the actual holes, the miners lower themselves into narrow mineralized pipes-- sometimes vertically hanging on ropes, other times narrow winding tubes.  They stay on the mountain for months on end.  Getting food, water or fuel requires either a supply run to the base (and back up) or further up the mountain to find water accumulated in previously excavated holes. I've seen lot of difficult work conditions, but this place left me wondering why anyone would even do this-- particularly when the same effort is required, whether or not any stones are actually found.  A friend answered this quite plainly: ''There are few jobs in the town.  If you don't take your studies seriously, you have few options.  Eventually you have to put bread on the table, and the mountain is the best bet.''  

Apart from the experiences and assistance with straightening out localities in my head that I gain from these trips, this is one reason I always insist on seeing the localities themselves, even if I know specimens will be few or nonexistent.  To see these labors first hand imparts a tremendous appreciation for the rocks, and an understanding of what it takes to mine them. One hears about spectacular ''alien eye fluorite'' and sees ''Ex.____ labels'', but trudging up the mountain to see the (from a ''mineral community'' standpoint) nameless miner digging for months on end only to find small bits, really puts things into perspective.  Even wholesale quality material represents the top several % of minerals from most areas, and actual fine specimens are an even more minuscule fraction still-- and I am not talking about only Erongo.       

I would like to note that while the Mineralogical Record's 2006 ''Erongo!'' issue graciously thanks the owners of the surrounding farms, they seem to make every effort to obstruct the local miners (many with legal mining claims) from reaching the mountain.  What this effectively means is that the miners must hop a fence then walk a minimum of 7 km in 100 F heat to the base of the mountain, then continue the trek upward-- in many cases carrying 50-60 lbs of gas, food, water, etc. After offering to pay the nearly $200 for a night at the lodge just for access to the road (and being refused ) I had the pleasure of experiencing this first hand (though my pack was just a little over 30 lbs). I repeatedly heard complaints from miners about this deliberate obstruction. And after hearing a lodge guard radio in that ''there is one 'white' guy and two black guys here,'' I gained some idea of the way things work. With this I segway to the original article, and maybe a criticism of the ''mineral culture.'' I noticed that it mainly cited collectors in big cities or neighboring countries-- the diggers themselves were largely overlooked as a source of knowledge, despite the author actually visiting the mountain. While these miners may not be peer reviewed or have Ph.D's, it's worth noting that most cited collectors and dealers do not go to the localities themselves. The miners are really the only way to know what species come from what areas, granted with some degree of verification, as misidentifications and exaggerations abound. A common problem in Africa though, is that most of the outdated surveys were done in colonial times, and I've noticed (particularly in the case of mineralogically important sites where the work is artisanal and not company/state run, regardless of country) that the experiences of the guys with the most up to date, first-hand knowledge (miners) are often overlooked in favor of foreigners with more limited limited first-hand experience. I've observed this in other places as well-- in fact the blue hemimorphite debacle at Ojuela was a direct result of ignoring locals in favor of people in the USA. To put this in perspective: the most experienced foreigners will be able to tell you what level of a mine a rock came from, based on a seeing a number of 2nd/ 3rd hand labels, whereas the miner might have been directly collecting on all those mine levels since he was 12. 

Anyway I hope you guys enjoy the rocks-- I tried to get as wide a variety as I could, and a couple things are actually somewhat unusual for the locality. 

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ERN00
$0

(right) The shaft tower at Tsumeb-- this was not for rocks, purely touristic.

The rest of the pictures are of Erongo.   I hope these pictures reenforce the description of the level of difficulty these miners endure. Note the tent, a typical example of where miners stay for months on end, and the terrain over which supplies need to be hauled.  The picture of the sheer granite face is where I gave up-- despite repeatedly being told to "trust your shoes" I wasn't going to risk a slip-- in some places, there is literally nothing to hold on to. I only made it to the first camp-- about 40% of the way to the furtherst (highest) one.
















ERN001
$0

Right: the entrances to several mineralized pipes on Erongo.

Below left: typical housing at the Brandberg mining camp, quartz in the foreground.

Below right: a humorously pointless stop sign in the middle of nowhere, with part of the Brandberg massif in the background. 







ERN01 Beryl var. Aquamarine
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
16.4x5.3x 4.8 cm
$2400

An unusually large example of aquamarine from Erongo, both crystals are terminated.  The smaller one has better color than the larger-- I had considered splitting it in two but decided against it because finding such large specimens is quite unusual for this locality.  Typically, when you get a piece of this size, it will be a felspar matrix covered in small aquamarines.  Associated with siderite and feldspar. 













ERN02 Schorl Tourmaline with Hyalite Opal
Rondeklip, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
21.2x 10.8x 5.7 cm
$2200

A beautiful example of sharp, lustrous schorl crystals aesthetically positioned on matrix.  As a mineral dealer, there are a few species you quickly learn to stay away from-- black tourmaline tops the list, but I thought these were quite exceptional, especially with the contrast offered by the vivid yellow-green, day-fluorescent hyalite highlights near bottom edge.  That color is best appreciated in sunlight, and you can see the glow even in shade of indirect, 4 pm winter sun. 

With the crystals arranged on top of a mount-like matrix, this was the best example of this material that I brought back. 











ERN03 Muscovite, Beryl var. Aquamarine with Fluorite
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
2.9x 2.2x 2.0 cm
$2200

Although small, this is easily my favorite piece from the trip.  Blue aquamarine and perfectly positioned green fluorite make for a spectacular combination.  I could write more, but the pictures say everything (and yes, I put extra pictures of this one because it's so nice from nearly every angle!)

Yes, I made it expensive.  But it's just one of those really memorable rocks that doesn't come around often.















ERN04 Duftite on Calcite
Tsumeb Mine, Otjikoto Region, Namibia
12.4x 8.3x 5.2 cm
$800

A decently sized example of this classic Tsumeb combination.  Although I visited Tsumeb for tourist purposes, I didn't actually expect to find a single rock from the mine available nearly 30 years after the mine closed.  This one came from an old collection in one of the larger cities. It has the crisp tree-frog green you would expect of this copper lead arsenate, over a cluster of calcite crystals that give it form. Some edge scuffing present. 







ERN05 Beryl var. Aquamarine with Schorl Tourmaline
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
11.6x 6.2x 5.1 cm
$1300

A nice hand-sized example of blue aquamarine on a matrix covered with schorl crystals-- many of those overgrown with small aquamarines themselves. Minor saw marks on the back edge







ERN05A Quartz var. Amethyst
Goboboseb Mtns., Brandberg Area, Erongo Region, Namibia
9.2x 6.3x 8.3 cm
$600

A nice example of a Goboboseb amethyst on matrix.  These are usually referred to as "Brandberg" amethyst, though in actuality nothing comes from there-- Brandberg is a protected reserve.  Most "Brandbergs" come from the Goboboseb Range-- specifically Tafelkop and the surrounding hills, most within sight of Brandberg itself.

This one is on matrix-- there are just a handful of local dealers who have invested in the tools to be able to cut these things out of the surrounding rock-- the majority however still com from small claims mined with hand tools, that is why most pieces have no matrix.









ERN06 Topaz
Klein Spitzkoppe, Erongo Region, Namibia
7.2x 3.6x 2.5 cm
$695

A rather large topaz crystal with an etched termination, from Klein Spitzkoppe. 

One thing I like about these trips is that is really helps me straighten out the locations of these places in my head, as well as providing insight into how these things are found.  Klein Spitzkoppe is approximately 40 km west of the main Erongo Massif.  It is the smaller of a pair of small mountains surrounded by very arid, rocky terrain.  Near the mountains, you start to find shelters built by the miners-- in some cases using boulders as walls.









ERN07 Smithsonite
Tsumeb Mine, Otjikoto Region, Namibia
2.4x 2.2x 1.4 cm
$400

A beautiful little thumbnail of pink smithsonite from old finds at the classic Tsumeb Mine. Minor chipping visible under magnification-- though it remains a very beautiful formation and arrangement crystals. 







ERN08 Apatite on Muscovite
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
2.6x 1.8x 1.8 cm
$385

Another special rock from this trip-- an Erongo apatite (and a pretty one, at that!). Although known from a number of other Namibian localities, examples from Erongo Mountain itself are exceeeeeedingly rare.  This one features two blue crystals on a pair of chunky muscovite books--  if there is any doubt as to the location, those muscovites (and their habit!) should settle it. 

Even on mindat, there ar only 3 pictures of Erongo Mountain apatites-- the rest are from other areas of the greater Erongo *Region,* near Uis and Rossing.  







ERN08A Fluorite, Quartz and Schorl Tourmaline
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
14.2x 10.5x 6.0 cm
$2200

A nicely arranged example of fluorite with quartz, from Erongo.  The matrix is a mixture of quartz and schorl tourmaline with a number of green fluorites (some with brown cores) scattered around a central quartz crystal.  As is typical for Erongo fluorite, it does need strong lighting for the color to be appreciated-- the ones near the edges light up particularly well. In order to display better, some of the back has been carved away as well to help light pass through.  







ERN09 Willemite
Tsumeb Mine, Otjikoto Region, Namibia
6.0x 4.0x 1.4 cm
$535

A beautiful example of this zinc silicate from the Tsumeb mine, featuring several green-blue clusters of the mineral.  Classic material found decades ago-- and in my opinion, these Tsumeb willemites are probably some of the most beautiful example of the species-- certainly more pleasant looking than the brown ones from Franklin, NJ or the pale stuff from Mexico.







ERN10 Fluorite
Hohenstein Farm, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
9.8x 6.2x 5.0 cm
$2000

This type of material was one of the things being discovered while I was in the area.  One of the holes at the first camp on the main trail leading up the mountain had just started to produce schorl included quartz, as well as a number of these interesting fluorite formations.  This is the best example I saw during the trip-- most were somewhat smaller, and for obvious reason: the delicate formations are easily shattered during extraction.  Somehow this one was preserved-- maybe the muscovite acted as some sort of shock absorber....











ERN11 Copper Pseudomorph
Otjihase Area, Khomas Region, Namibia
6.7x 4.7x 4.0 cm
$650

An interesting example of copper after something else-- it could have been azurite, or something else. There were only three of these, an exploration geologist had discovered them during the course of work in the area.  This is the last one I have left.  If someone just showed me this and said "It is from Namibia," I would instantly think Tsumeb-- except it isnt. 









ERN12 Fluorite with Muscovite
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
4.7x 4.4x 3.4 cm
$385

A beautiful example of gemmy green fluorites on matrix, with elongated muscovite books. Something about this piece makes it stand out-- I think its the combination of color with luster and transparency-- usually Erongo fluorite is more frosted.  That, combined with the crisp green of the fluorite and the muscovite association give the piece a well composed, clean appearance. And as banged up as most things get up there, "clean" is not something to be taken lightly!







ERN13 Orthoclase, Fluorite with Quartz
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
11.7x 8.5x 9.0 cm
$650

Although it might seem to some like the point of this specimen is the fluorite, it is in truth a quartz specimen. The fluorite is actually a group of flattened crystals coating part of the crystalized feldspar matrix in such a way as to make it seem like a single crystal-- it is only upon looking closer that you realize this is not the case. 

The true star here however, is the quartz.  Erongo quartz is usually not this lustrous, or (relatively) clear.  And what is more, the tip is pristine. One small chip on the fluorite area, though. 

I was going up the mountain as a group of miners were coming down.... an impromptu mineral show occurred on the trail, in the shade between two learning boulders.  This was one of the pieces-- of course I was still on my way up, so it (along with a number of others) got wrapped up and added to bags that were already heavy with water and other items, before continuing the steep trail up the mountain.... I should also point out that this specimen has since been trimmed! (no additional hauling fee)












ERN14 Fluorite
8.4x 8.1x 5.2 cm
$495

An older specimen, this piece consists of a cluster of green fluorite cubes with an interesting, linear arrangement on a feldspar matrix.







ERN15 Beryl var. Aquamarine
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
4.0x 3.9x 1.7 cm
$335

A pretty example of blue aquamarine with feldspar, from Erongo Mountain. 







ERN16 Beryl var. Aquamarine
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
3.9x 2.7x 2.6 cm
$195

A pretty example of blue aquamarine with feldspar, from Erongo Mountain. 







ERN17 Quartz var. Amethyst
Goboboseb Mtns., Brandberg Area, Erongo Region, Namibia
10.3x 7.3x 6.3 cm
$650

A nice example rather beautifully arranged amethyst crystals (the points are pristine!) with pale purple wisps.  The main two crystals are situated on a cluster of colorless quartz, and there is a tiny bit of associated prehnite.   









ERN18 Topaz on Orthoclase
Klein Spitzkoppe, Erongo Region, Namibia
6.3x3.5x 5.5 cm
$680

A relatively rare matrix example of topaz from Klein Spitzkoppe. Almost all the examples I saw were matrixless crystals, and of the several I did see with matrix, most were hopelessly damaged in exactly the wrong places.  I did manage to get a few matrix specimens, of which this was the largest.  









ERN19 Smithsonite
Tsumeb Mine, Otjikoto Region, Namibia
3.2x 2.7x 1.7 cm
$345

A beautiful "toenail" sized example of pink smithsonite from finds made decades ago at the Tsumeb Mine. 







ERN20 Schorl Tourmaline with Hyalite Opal
Rondeklip, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
8.5x 5.3x 2.9 cm
$395

A beautiful example of sharp, lustrous schorl crystals aesthetically positioned on matrix.  As a mineral dealer, there are a few species you quickly learn to stay away from-- black tourmaline tops the list, but I thought these were quite exceptional, especially with the contrast offered by the vivid yellow-green, day-fluorescent hyalite highlights near top edge.  That color is best appreciated in sunlight, and you can see the glow even in shade of indirect, 4 pm winter sun (pictured). 

This one glows particularly well!












ERN21 Ilmenite
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
4.6x 3.8x 1.4 cm
$400

A rather sharp example of this iron, titanium oxide from Erongo.  This is one of the minerals known to occur somewhat more rarely on the mountain, and I suspect one that also gets overlooked by international dealers as it isn't exactly a colorful fluorite on aquamarine. 

According to the Mineralogical Record's "Erongo" issue, the orange surface coating is mildly radioactive.  Oddly, the crystal also appears to have a bit of lamellar splitting visible along the edge-- maybe a long-term result of radiation damage?  I see similar things in betafites from Canada, of course those are much, much more radioactive so it makes more sense. 







ERN22 Schorl Tourmaline
Rondeklip, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
3.2x 2.8x 2.5 cm
$95

In the last few months, a massive pocket of schorl was discovered.  As it is what was available,  I bought a lot to put away... though there were a few that stood out.  I particularly liked this one-- it's just satisfyingly to-the-point, isolated, clean, lustrous and..... chunky.









ERN23
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
9.0x 7.1x 6.3 cm
$485

A rare example of "gitter" quartz, from the German for "grid" or "lattice"-- so called because of the crosshatch arrangement of the quartz crystals that have epitaxially grown on the underlying orthoclase. These are primarily known from very old finds, though there seems to have been a pocket of the stuff discovered more recently as well. This was the largest example I brought back. 











ERN24 Fluorite, Quartz incl. Schorl Tourmaline
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
7.6x 6.8x 4.7 cm
$585

A nice specimen of deep green fluorite associated with a schorl-included quartz crystal, muscovite, and a larger partial schorl crystal. 









ERN25 Quartz var. Amethyst
Goboboseb Mtns., Brandberg Area, Erongo Region, Namibia
6.8x 1.8x 1.9 cm
$200

A very beautiful amethyst crystal from Goboboseb, with deep purple phantoms and even a small enhydro with a moving bubble.  

Although most of this quartz is marketed as coming from "Brandberg," that mountain is actually protected.  Most of the amethyst comes from Tafelkop and the surrounding hills/ mountains in the Goboboseb range, within view of Brandberg itself. 







ERN26 Smoky Quartz
Goboboseb Mtns., Brandberg Area, Erongo Region, Namibia
6.5x 6.3x 3.2 cm
$135

A nice crystal on matrix, with nice smoky wisps.  From the Goboboseb mountains, the same area better known for its amethysts. Little chip on the top. 







ERN27 Orthoclase Twin on Schorl Tourmaline
Rondeklip, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
9.5x 3.2x 2.9 cm
$200

Pieces like this are why I love Erongo-- they're not always beautiful, but they're certainly interesting and unusual.  This is a doubly terminated schorl crystal with a twinned orthoclase sitting on top, at a really screwy angle.  It's just so weird....









ERN28 Orthclase
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
9.7x 7.2x 3.3 cm
$195

A nice cluster of terminated orthoclase crystals, the smooth chunky ivory-ness combined with the interesting, jackstraw-esque clustering  make it quite satisfying to look at. 







ERN29 Fluorite
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
5.0x 4.5x 1.9 cm
$300

A nice example of a flattened spinel twin fluorite from Erongo, this is one of the habits that the area is known for.  One area of cleaving on the back, but somewhat hard to tell.  







ERN30 Fluorite (Spinel twin)
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
4.3x 3.4x 2.0 cm
$265

A flattened fluorite spinel twin, from Erongo. Light blue color, with purplish highlights near the surface.  This is one of the fluorite habits that erongo is particularly known for. 







ERN31 Schorl Tourmaline with Hyalite Opal
Rondeklip, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
13.6x 9.2x 5.8 cm
$685

A beautiful example of sharp, lustrous schorl crystals aesthetically positioned on matrix.  As a mineral dealer, there are a few species you quickly learn to stay away from-- black tourmaline tops the list, but I thought these were quite exceptional, especially with the contrast offered by the yellow-green hyalite opal. That color is best appreciated in sunlight, and you can see the glow even in shade of indirect, 4 pm winter sun. 













ERN32 Quartz
Goboboseb Mtns., Brandberg Area, Erongo Region, Namibia
4.1x 3.1x 3.2 cm
$125

A beautiful example of a lightly smoky, scepter quartz crystal perched in a cluster on colorless crystals. 







ERN33 Quartz Twin
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
4.4x 4.4x 3.1 cm
$280

A really interesting group of quartz crystals from Erongo-- it's a smoky twin.  Not a 90 degree Japan law twin, but definitely a twin. This is the only twin I have personally seen from the mountain, and even on Mindat I see only one other. 









ERN34 Topaz
Klein Spitzkoppe, Erongo Region, Namibia
3.1x 2.3x 2.0 cm
$165

A pretty "toenail" sized topaz specimen from Klein Spitzkoppe, with a light smoky color. Its an interestingly beautiful formation of stacked, staggered crystals. One chip on the side, mostly visible from the back. 







ERN34A Ilmenite
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
5.9x 4.7x 2.3 cm
$650

A rather large example of this iron, titanium oxide from Erongo.  This is one of the minerals known to occur somewhat more rarely on the mountain, and I suspect one that also gets overlooked by international dealers as it isn't exactly a colorful fluorite on aquamarine. To put it in perspective, there are only 6 pictures of this material on mindat.

According to the Mineralogical Record's "Erongo" issue, the orange surface coating is mildly radioactive. 







ERN35 Ilmenite
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
3.1x 1.9x 1.3 cm
$195

A particularly sharp, toenail-sized example of this iron, titanium oxide from Erongo.  This is one of the minerals known to occur somewhat more rarely on the mountain, and I suspect one that also gets overlooked by international dealers as it isn't exactly a colorful fluorite on aquamarine. To put it in perspective, there are only 6 pictures of this material on mindat.

According to the Mineralogical Record's "Erongo" issue, the orange surface coating is mildly radioactive. 







ERN36 Hyalite Opal (Day Fluorescent)
Rondeklip, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
10.8x 5.9x 4.8 cm
$295

A nice example of day fluorescent hyalite opal from recent finds at Erongo.  Hyalite is extremely common on the mountain-- in fact, the difficult-to-remove coating often fouls up good specimens.  All most all of it however, is just crappy white stuff.  

Examples from the recent discovery however display good day fluorescence, and appear bright yellow with a greenish tinge under strong sunlight.  In addition to pictures (with the white background) under normal LED's, I've also included pictures with a UV laser (to show full fluorescence) and next to a window, to better show the day fluorescence. Even under indirect, 4 pm winter sunlight, you can still see a glow.  









ERN37 Hyalite Opal (Day Fluorescent)
Rondeklip, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
7.1x 4.0x 2.4 cm
$170

A nice example of day fluorescent hyalite opal from recent finds at Erongo.  Hyalite is extremely common on the mountain-- in fact, the difficult-to-remove coating often fouls up good specimens.  All most all of it however, is just crappy white stuff.  

Examples from the recent discovery however display good day fluorescence, and appear bright yellow with a greenish tinge under strong sunlight.  In addition to pictures (with the white background) under normal LED's, I've also included pictures with a UV laser (to show full fluorescence) and next to a window, to better show the day fluorescence. Even under indirect, 4 pm winter sunlight, you can still see a glow.  









ERN38 Hyalite Opal (Day Fluorescent)
Rondeklip, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
5.9x 4.4x 3.0 cm
$145

A nice example of day fluorescent hyalite opal from recent finds at Erongo.  Hyalite is extremely common on the mountain-- in fact, the difficult-to-remove coating often fouls up good specimens.  All most all of it however, is just crappy white stuff.  

Examples from the recent discovery however display good day fluorescence, and appear bright yellow with a greenish tinge under strong sunlight.  In addition to pictures (with the white background) under normal LED's, I've also included pictures with a UV laser (to show full fluorescence) and next to a window, to better show the day fluorescence. Even under indirect, 4 pm winter sunlight, you can still see a glow.  







ERN39 Siderite
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
9.8x 5.2x 2.9 cm
$395

At Erongo, siderite is pretty much just an accessory mineral.  You see it third-wheeling pretty combinations of aquamarine and schorl, or lurking annoyingly off to the side on a matrix who's focus is something else.  But this piece is actually a good siderite in its own right.  The crystal is particularly large and sits nice and centered, surrounded by dirty crystals of what is probably the only other (common) mineral found on erongo that it can eclipse: feldspar. I see at least one twinned feldspar though... 







ERN40 Quartz var. Amethyst on Calcite
Goboboseb Mtns., Brandberg Area, Erongo Region, Namibia
7.4x 4.0x 2.9 cm
$265

A nice example of amethyst on matrix from Goboboseb.







ERN41 Hyalite Opal (Day Fluorescent) on Quartz
Rondeklip, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
7.6x 2.0x 1.5 cm
$165

A very neat specimen from the recent find of day fluorescent hyalite opal-- this one has an accumulation of the stuff on the tip of a smoky quartz crystal.  It looks like someone took a smoky quartz crystal quickly dipped it in melted plastic, and sloshed it around a bit. The pictures are taken under LED lighting, so the color is a little duller than what you would see in sunlight. The bright green image was taken with a UV spotlight pointed at the hyalite.  







ERN42 Schorl Tourmaline with Hyalite Opal
Rondeklip, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
4.7x 4.4x 2.2 cm
$135

An interesting example of schorl tourmaline perched on a quartz matrix.  Most of the hyalite is just transparent jelly, but the bit towards the bottom corner has good fluorescence.  The schorl itself is complete not he front and back









ERN43 Schorl Tourmaline
Rondeklip, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
4.9x 4.0x 2.0 cm
$85

A nice specimen of bright lustrous schorl tourmaline, well positioned on a quartz matrix.  Some edge chipping present. 







ERN44 Gitter Quartz
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
6.9x 2.9x 2.3 cm
$135

A rare example of "gitter" quartz, from the German for "grid" or "lattice"-- so called because of the crosshatch arrangement of the quartz crystals that have epitaxially grown on the underlying orthoclase. These are primarily known from very old finds, though there seems to have been a pocket of the stuff discovered more recently as well. 







ERN45 "Gitter" Quartz
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
5.4x 4.4x 2.3 cm
$175

A rare example of "gitter" quartz, from the German for "grid" or "lattice"-- so called because of the crosshatch arrangement of the quartz crystals that have epitaxially grown on the underlying orthoclase. These are primarily known from very old finds, though there seems to have been a pocket of the stuff discovered more recently as well. 









ERN46 Fluorite on Orthoclase Twin
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
4.3x 4.2x 2.8 cm
$145

A twinned orthoclase crystal, with a number of dark purple fluorite cubes scattered on it. 









ERN47 Schorl Tourmaline with Muscovite
Hohenstein Farm, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
13.5x 7.6x 6.2 cm
$195

A large schorl crystal from recent finds at Erongo, this one also has a few chunky, greenish muscovite books clinging to the sides. Ugly, but good example for those who like Erongo or Namibian minerals. 







ERN48 Quartz incl Schorl Tourmaline
Hohenstein Farm, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
9.2x 6.8x 7.1 cm
$275

A nice example of schorl included quartz, from a hole near the first level of mining camps about 40% of the way up the mountain. Somewhat different from the usual Erongo material, I'd day mainly because of the relative clarity of the quartz.  









ERN49 Schorl Tourmaline
Rondeklip, Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
7.1x 4.8x 3.8 cm
$365

Schorl is neatly impossible for me to sell, but I liked this so screw it. The crystal is lustrous and sharp, and sits about as well as you could ask for on the edge of its matrix. If there was such thing as a "desirable schorl" I would assume this is about as close as you can get.... 









ERN50 Chalcedony and Quartz
Rossing Mountains Area, Arandis Constituency, Erongo Region, Namibia
15.7x 7.6x 5.7 cm
$365

A chalcedony concretion resembling a prettier version of the stuff that gets polished and sold as "blue lace agate."  I thought this was interesting because it was on matrix and complete.  I also found it a little funny how the matrix broke in such a way that made the whole thing look like a crocodile head. 







ERN51 Chalcedony and Quartz
Rossing Mountains Area, Arandis Constituency, Erongo Region, Namibia
7.6x 6.3x 5.4 cm
$285

A chalcedony concretion resembling a prettier version of the stuff that gets polished and sold as "blue lace agate."  This one looks a little like a clam. 







ERN52 Beryl var. Aquamarine
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
2.8x 2.2x 2.0 cm
$135

A very pretty thumbnail of blue aquamarine with a little bit of feldspar clinging to the side. 







ERN53 Beryl var. Aquamarine
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
2.8x 2.2x 1.7 cm
$90

A cluster of small blue aquamarines on a feldspar matrix. 







ERN54 Beryl var. Aquamarine
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
2.6x 1.55x 1.55 cm
$125

A thumbnail-sized, terminated aquamarine from Erongo-- this one is special because of the clarity.  Although clear aquas do come from Klein Spitzkoppe, Erongo's aquamarines are almost always cloudy and blue.  Interestingly enough, this one us quite gemmy. 







ERN55 Beryl var. Aquamarine
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
3.6x 2.7x 2.2 cm
$135

An interesting aquamarine specimen from an older pocket, hosting a spray of crystals with bases that have a light coating of hyalite and iron oxide.  The matrix is quartz with schorl. 









ERN56 Topaz
Klein Spitzkoppe, Erongo Region, Namibia
2.6x 2.0x 1.6 cm
$80

A nice example a terminated, gemmy topaz crystal from Klein Spitzkoppe. Nice etching visible on the surfaces.









ERN57 Fluorite on Tourmaline
Erongo Mountain, Erongo Region, Namibia
3.5x 1.0x 1.1 cm
$135

A cluster of dark purplish fluorites (the color in the pictures is with strong lighting) perched not he side of a terminated schorl crystal. 









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